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Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces That Shape Behavior

Год выпуска: 2016
Автор: Jonah Berger

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments

The New York Times bestselling author of Contagious explores the subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions we makefrom what we buy, to the careers we choose, to what we eatin this fascinating and groundbreaking work.

If youre like most people, you think that your choices and behaviors are driven by your individual, personal tastes, and opinions. You wear a certain jacket because you liked the way it looked. You picked a particular career because you found it interesting. The notion that our choices are driven by our own personal thoughts and opinions is patently obvious. Right? Wrong.

Without our realizing it, other peoples behavior has a huge influence on everything we do at every moment of our lives, from the mundane to the momentous occasion. Even strangers have a startling impact on our judgments and decisions: our attitudes toward a welfare policy shift if were told it is supported by Democrats versus Republicans (even though the policy is the same in both cases).

But social influence doesnt just lead us to do the same things as others. In some cases we conform, or imitate others around us. But in other cases we diverge, or avoid particular choices or behaviors because other people are doing them. We stop listening to a band because they go mainstream. We skip buying the minivan because we dont want to look like a soccer mom.

In his surprising and compelling Invisible Influence, Jonah Berger integrates research and thinking from business, psychology, and social science to focus on the subtle, invisible influences behind our choices as individuals. By understanding how social influence works, we can decide when to resist and when to embrace itand how we can use this knowledge to make better-informed decisions and exercise more control over our own behavior.

Review

Expanding on the ideas explored in his 2013 bestseller Contagious Berger offers an engaging guide to the concept of social influence. He examines how opposing categories of socially motivated behaviorimitation and differentiationcombine to create complex cultural patterns. He shows for example the imperceptible communal nudges behind baby naming trends racial achievement gaps and group decision making at work. Though Berger teaches marketing his book appeals to readers beyond the M.B.A.s. Ultimately the focus is on applied psychology. We like things that are moderately similar he says blending the allure of novelty with the comfort of the familiar. Some of his points are familiar from Psychology 101: familiarity increases attraction stereotypes are shortcuts used to process new information. But unlike the writing in the average psych textbook Bergers prose is consistently entertaining applying science to real life in surprising ways and explaining research through narrative. He can be repetitive and his stylistic brevity becomes distracting: sentence fragments are overused. Still it makes for good retention. Social influence is an intricate subject but Berger simplifies without patronizing. His book fascinates because it opens up the moving parts of a mysterious machine allowing readers to watch them in action. (June) " Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."

Review

Expanding on the ideas explored in his 2013 bestseller Contagious Berger offers an engaging guide to the concept of social influence. He examines how opposing categories of socially motivated behaviorimitation and differentiationcombine to create complex cultural patterns. He shows for example the imperceptible communal nudges behind baby naming trends racial achievement gaps and group decision making at work. Though Berger teaches marketing his book appeals to readers beyond the M.B.A.s. Ultimately the focus is on applied psychology. We like things that are moderately similar he says blending the allure of novelty with the comfort of the familiar. Some of his points are familiar from Psychology 101: familiarity increases attraction stereotypes are shortcuts used to process new information. But unlike the writing in the average psych textbook Bergers prose is consistently entertaining applying science to real life in surprising ways and explaining research through narrative. He can be repetitive and his stylistic brevity becomes distracting: sentence fragments are overused. Still it makes for good retention. Social influence is an intricate subject but Berger simplifies without patronizing. His book fascinates because it opens up the moving parts of a mysterious machine allowing readers to watch them in action. (June) " Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved."

Review

"Berger picks up where his Contagious: Why Things Catch On (2013) left off to explore why we desire what we doand more, why we act as we do, politically, socially, economically, and emotionallyhe does a good job of distilling scientific insights into easily understood object lessons on social psychology." Kirkus Reviews

Review

"Berger offers an engaging guide to the concept of social influence. Bergers prose is consistently entertaining, applying science to real life in surprising ways and explaining research through narrative. His book fascinates because it opens up the moving parts of a mysterious machine, allowing readers to watch them in action." Publishers Weekly

Review

"As he did with Contagious, Jonah Berger takes us deep beneath the surface of things, with mesmerizing results. Invisible Influence is a book with the power to transform the way we see ourselves and our place in the world." Arianna Huffington, author of Thrive

Review

"With great insight, Jonah Berger removes the cloak of invisibility from powerful sources of influence and resolves fascinating mysteries of human behavior." Robert Cialdini, author of Influence

About the Author

Jonah Berger is an associate professor of marketing at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His research has been published in top-tier academic journals, and popular accounts of his work have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Science, Harvard Business Review, and more. His research has also been featured in the New York Times Magazines Year in Ideas. Berger has been recognized with a number of awards for both scholarship and teaching. The author of Contagious and Invisible Influence, he lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


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